Tram system - Sample Essay

This graph is also very significant as it shows that the tram system really isn’t up to scratch. A vast majority of people said that it ‘could be better’. Meaning that something has to be improved to make it a worthwhile asset to Nottingham and Nottingham’s transport system. After all, if people aren’t going to ride on the tram, as it just isn’t good enough or not suitable for them, there is just going to be more traffic as the tram clogs up space on the roads. One person even went to the extreme of saying the tram system was ‘awful’.

I think this person was very critical, and that point should be discarded as only 1 in 30 people said it was ‘awful’. A fair amount of people suggested that the tram system was OK. This gives the tram a brief respite from critical bombardment, but only less than a third of the people thought it was OK. 4 people actually thought the tram system was ‘pretty good’, so there are actually some supporters of the NET! Overall this graph sums up that the tram system could be a lot better. The majority of the public believe that it ‘could be better’ or its just ‘OK’.

This really isn’t good enough for the reintroduction of the tram, as it needs to be something special to make people move away from their current transport system. “… It is estimated that each year line one will take 2 million car journeys off our roads… ” This is the prediction NET made when the project for line one was in production. It seems that that prediction is not reality; instead people believe that the tram is just another hindrance as the majority of people state the tram ‘could be better’. Fig 8. I think this is the most momentous out of all the results of my questionnaires.

It shows that the worst thing is obviously the positioning of the tram network. It just doesn’t cover enough significant space and isn’t down the right paths. With only one route, it needs to be greatly expanded. I don’t think the tram will ever particularly ‘take off’, if the routes aren’t expanded. They are the key issue, as my audience has provided me with it. With the tram going on only one route, the majority of Nottingham’s public aren’t going to use it, as it just doesn’t go near their residential setting. Only people that actually live near the route might use it, and that is a very small minority of Nottingham’s populace.

The tram really can’t compete with the bus when positioning is the main issue. The bus travels everywhere in Nottingham, and is mostly convenient for everyone. The tram just can’t rival that with only one route, and when its not popular, other routes won’t be built. As it can’t get popular as the main downside is positioning, it really isn’t going to be a big success. Timing was the other main downside about the tram system, as it appears to be quite regularly late. It’s only give-or-take a few minutes, but that’s a long time in terms of public transport. People want transport on the dot, and being late regularly just isn’t acceptable.

The NET had planned for the trams to arrive as close to the proposed time as possible. This would enhance the popularity of the tram and make people want to use the tram instead of the bus. Buses are usually not exactly on time, and when people are in a hurry, they want reliability. This was where the tram was supposed to come in, but according to my questionnaire results it doesn’t seem like it met its proposed requirements. The next question of my questionnaire cannot be graphed, as it required the public to write their answer rather than just circle an answer.

I obviously got a lot of different results for this question, as most people write different things. The most popular answers were as follows: How could the trams be improved? Need to be closer to residential areas. Expand the network to cover south side of city. Have more trams running. Make more routes/Expand the network. Make them run later in the evenings. I did encounter a trend though, as the most popular answers came from “Make more routes/Expand the network. ” This is definitely what needs to be done as it now has been proved by 2 questions from my questionnaire. Fig 9.

This result to my questionnaire is not very surprising due to the other results of my questionnaire. It shows that nearly double the amount of people feel the tram is not an attractive factor than that that do. It shows NET have not done enough research themselves when it come to the publics opinion, as the majority of the populace of Nottingham is not satisfied with the tram system. Fig 10. This result confirms all the other points I have been making about the tram system. Nearly 100% of people wanted the tram network to get expanded, to the benefit of all living in and outside of Nottingham.

Only very small amounts of people want to keep it the same and I expect those people live right next to the tram route themselves so there is no need for it to be expanded from their opinion. For the people that want the tram network to be smaller, all I can speculate is that they despise the tram network and want it completely removed from Nottingham. Vienna is a large European city that has a very extensive and well-established integrated public transport system. Unlike many other European cities that scrapped their original tram network in the 1950-60’s, Vienna retained their original tram network that now comprises of 36 different routes.

Efficient bus routes and a comprehensive metro network compliment these routes. Vienna is a very ancient city and has many small narrow streets, making it particularly car-unfriendly. The public therefore have been used to taking tram, metro and bus to get from A to B. As they have a decent choice of transport methods, they are happy to do without their car, and the integrated transport system works very well for them. Fig 11. Photograph to show Vienna tram system in working action.

Nottingham has now recently launched a scheme named ‘the big wheel’ which aims to persuade the populace of Nottingham to use integrated transport, to walk and cycle more, and to use less cars. Cycle lanes are under construction to make the roads more accessible and ‘cyclist friendly’. Vienna has been using an integrated transport system for an age of years now. Its trams are one of the most ancient in the world and are a historical landmark for Vienna. It is this use of integrated transport that has allowed Vienna to survive the evolution of civilisation, as the city of Vienna is extremely old and narrow.