Racial Discrimination and Its Effects to the Society - Sample Essay

Megacities are plagued by even more serious problems. Besides insufficient housing, overcrowded schools, and understaffed hospitals, psychological aspects are also involved. Dr. Paul Leyhausen, a leading German ethologist, claims that “a great number of neuroses and social maladjustments are, partially or totally, directly or indirectly, caused by overcrowding. ” (1999, 12). Megacities rob their citizens of a sense of community, turning the city into a faceless mass of numbers.

In the midst of hundreds of neighbors, a city dweller can be lonely, yearning for friends and companions he can find nowhere. The sense of alienation created by this situation becomes dangerous when it causes multinational populations to break up into racial or ethnic groups. Economic inequalities or acts of discrimination—real or imagined—can lead to disaster, as Los Angeles learned in 1992 when outbreaks of racial violence resulted in more than 50 deaths and 2,000 injuries (Leyhausen, 1999, 13).

Indeed, racial discrimination is already considered as a social plague, affecting the whole world. And Along with this, the fact that the whole society of man is naturally diverse, even people who aims to help the society with their problems regarding the issues of social diversity also face the same challenge of staying united amidst the changes they have against each other.

Cities especially encounter the grave effects of the issues behind racial discrimination and according to the American Psychological Association, these dilemmas bring so much depression and stress to the population comprising the cities’ territories. This is also the main reason why behind the wonderful goals of social workers around the globe, issues such as racial discrimination brings them so much hindrance in getting their goals done for the society.

As mentioned earlier, several researchers already worked on this topic and thus got considerably fine results regarding their studies. Through the use of surveys and interviews, a lot of the results of the studies were taken into conclusion. The following paragraphs shall discuss several ways in which racial discrimination has been proven as a part of the regular social work and yet had been continuously used by many social workers as an opportunity to bond together better than to simply get along with the flow of dispute brought about by the issue.

In the Journal of Women and Social Work in an article entitled “What racial discrimination does to the social work society”, it has been mentioned that racial discrimination is indeed considered an organizational sickness especially when it comes to working ethics (Dinerman, 2005, 11). Usually, this issue of diversity causes a lot of problems within the system of assistance that social workers give to their fellowmen. It has been mentioned too that racial discrimination also sets the workers apart and drives them to choose who among the needy people should they help basing upon the cultural or racial qualification of the person to be helped.

On the other hand, the British Association of Social Workers say otherwise, to them “racial discrimination is an opportunity opened to the social workers in showing their unity and bond beyond the cultural differences they have from each other (1999, 14). True, if the issue is carefully dealt with, racial discrimination could bring different people joined by an organization in a stronger bond. It may be considered an irony by many.

However, because of the fact that the right ways of facing the dilemma had brought many social organizations more bonded together than separated by differences, it is really not impossible to make the issue of racial discrimination “a bridge to better opportunities of bonding with people from other cultures. Seeing differences as a positive factor in the society which sets the uniqueness of each individual in the entire human community” (British Association of Social Work, 1999, 12) is indeed a key factor in making racial diversity a successful aspect of the social organizations.