Minimally two-party - Sample Essay

Conversation is a ‘minimally two-party’ activity. It requires that there be both a ‘speaker’ and a ‘hearer’. The sequence constitutes a coordinated entry into the activity allowing each party an occasion to demonstrate his coordination with the other, a coordination that may then be sustained by the parties demonstrating continued speakership or hearership. In the problem on coordination on the suspension of the transition relevance, adjacency pairs are considered. Instances of pair types are ‘question-answer’, ‘greeting-greeting’, and offer-acceptance/refusal’.

Adjacency pairs consist of sequences which properly have the following length: two utterance length, adjacent positioning of component utterances, and different speakers producing utterance. The basic rule of adjacency pair is: given the recognizable production of a first pair part, on its first possible completion its speaker should stop and a next speaker should start and produce a second pair part form the pair type of which the first is recognizable as a member (Ten Have, 1999).

Another kind of sequence-like structure consisting repetitive cycles of similar sequences, such as question-answer sequences in an interrogation or interview is what Harvey Sack called ‘chaining’. In communication studies, chain is a term use to describe a model which presents the communicative act as an interrelated sequence of stages between speaker and a receiver.

Chaining rule is when: a person who has asked a question can talk again, has, as we may put it, a reserved right to talk again, after the one to whom he has addressed the question speaks, an in using the reserved right he can ask a question (Ten Have, 1999). Finally, to account for back channel support in the linguistic analyses of dramatic dialogue is deemed necessary.

Back channel support or sometimes called as minimal responses are either speech sounds (i. e.uhuh, yeah, mmmhm) or gestures to signal attention to the speaker in a number of ways (Ten Have, 1999). With the integration of Gricean approach and discourse analyses on the linguistic features; turns, pauses, adjacency pairs, chaining, and back channel support, dramatic dialogues will not be viewed and analyzed impressionistically rather logically by finding meaning through linguistic method: locating meaning within the dramatic dialogues’ textual to interactional aspect.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books Barton, D. (2006). Literacy: An Introduction to the Ecology of Written Language. Blackwell Publishing. http://books. google. com. ph/books? id=4ZjfJ8cPe1UC&printsec =frontcover&dq=written+language&hl=en#PPA74,M1 Culpeper, J. , Short, M. , Short, M. & Verdonk, P. (1998). Exploring the Language of Drama: From Text to Context. Routledge. http://books. google. com/books? id=Urt2b9okhLIC