Evaluation and Review - Sample Essay

All jobs, to some degree, require knowledge of health and safety. Some jobs require particular safety equipment (like hard hats, jeans, and work boots in the building trade), and students should be familiar with this equipment that they will be expected to use on a daily basis. However, even in jobs with less obvious threats, like office jobs, there are still harassment laws and accidents. Students in these activities look at general health, what they would do in an unusual situation (like being stuck in a lift), and also reading safety instructions and warnings.

Different warning labels may be found all over the place in any office building. All would certainly have something about emergency exits and fire doors. Students should understand how to read these signs and how to react to them both on a daily basis (don’t use the alarmed door for normal exit) and in an emergency. Warning signs are also possible in every job, such as “Caution, wet floor. ” Students should be taught to be able to tell what different signs mean by their shape, color, and what is written on them, and to understand any instructions the sign might be giving.

For example, students should understand that if a floor is wet, it means it is slippery and they could fall, and should walk slowly or find an alternate path. Finally, accidents do happen the workplace, and students should know how to react to them. Students should understand about first aid, including who should perform and under what circumstances. Students should also be aware of people with disabilities and their unique needs. Students should also learn how to evaluate their own performances, and how to understand others’ evaluations of their performance.

Most jobs issue quarterly to yearly reviews, and students should understand how to read and understand these evaluations. Students can practice by filling out self-evaluations, which will use the same kind of language as employer evaluations will. It is important for students to understand the different between negative and positive comments, and also how to put the negatives into actions – i. e. “I’m going to work improving my client care this year. ” Students in this section also look at tests and evaluations, by creating them.

If students can practice creating them, then they can understand them better, including how and why they are created and in what circumstances they may be used. At the end, students can fill out self-evaluation and course feedback forms regarding the actual course, which should help them to discern their strengths and weaknesses, and to understand what they could do better in the future. Conclusion This course looks carefully at students’ needs on the job, and incorporates many different activities into their studies.

It also incorporates everyday situations that students are likely already familiar with. This can help some students to make the connections between the familiar and unfamiliar situations, and figure out how to deal with issues at work. This course could, however, benefit from more examples which are directly related to the students’ jobs. Many examples are only from real-life situations, or are from jobs that the students are not pursuing. Instead, adjusting the scenarios to include the students’ job situations would help the material to be more relevant to them.

This opinion is backed up by the student questionnaires, found in the section below. Most students felt that work that was relevant to their jobs was most beneficial to them. In general, this course is well-designed, with good language use, and good exposure to a variety of situations. It also addresses unusual episodes of language use (such as numbers or health and safety) that are easily overlooked in most job training courses. Students who finish this course should be fairly well prepared to go out into their respective fields and to feel confident in themselves and their work.